Key data & rankings

Student numbers

  • 350 students in the engineering cycle
  • 100 engineering graduates per year
  • 50% of girls
  • 20% of international students
  • Intense community involvement
  • 48 students in Master’s programs
  • About one hundred PhD students, of which 40% are international students

The program

Engineering cycle

  • A program that covers all areas of chemistry: organic chemistry, materials chemistry, physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, process engineering, energy, etc.
  • A program in human sciences, management and entrepreneurship
  • A research center that is closely aligned with the program

Master’s

  • Chimie ParisTech is actively participating in 4 Master’s programs

PhD

  • Nearly 40 theses are defended every year
  • 15% of the theses are under a CIFRE agreement

Professional integration, engineering cycle

  • Average salary between 37,000 and 41,000 euros/year
  • 95% of the students who graduate from the engineering cycle are employed within 6 months of graduation.
  • The program includes 12 months of internships

International

  • 100% of engineering students travel abroad during their studies
  • 17 dual-degree agreements

Faculty

  • 96 research professors, of which 1/3 are CNRS researchers

Research

  • 3 laboratories
  • 11 research teams

Rankings in the press

Usine nouvelle

In 2018, Chimie ParisTech ranked 7th out of the 130 engineering schools listed in France. It consolidates its national position across all engineering schools with a very competitive insertion and employability rate. With 20% of these jobs going abroad, the school is now in the top 10 with major engineering schools.

To learn more

L’Etudiant

With a total of 41 points in L’Etudiant’s ranking, Chimie ParisTech is at the top of the magazine’s ranking, which includes 174 engineering schools. The school stands out for its academic excellence and its international openness.

To learn more

In existence for over a century

1896
1900
1901
1906
1909
1910
1916
1920
1930
1928-1938
1948
1966
1986
1999
2008
2010
2011
2015

1896

Creation of the École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie of Paris by Charles Friedel, holder of the Chair of Organic Chemistry at the Sorbonne, as “a laboratory for practical and industrial chemistry for the Paris Faculty of Sciences”. The April 29, 1896 ministerial decree for the creation was signed by the Minister of Public Instruction, Emile Combes. Charles Friedel became its first Director and the University put temporary barracks at his disposal at No. 3, rue Michelet, near Avenue de l’Observatoire. The laboratory began its first class at the beginning of the academic year on November 3, 1896.

1896

1900

Creation of the Alumni Association of the Institute of Applied Chemistry

1900

1901

Henri Moissan is appointed Director upon Charles Friedel’s death. He changes the name of the institution to The Institute of Applied Chemistry.

1901

1906

On March 17, 1906, Henri Moissan secured an agreement, through a law, between the State, the University of Paris and the City of Paris for the construction of a “Chemical Institute”.
The December 29, 1906 Decree stipulates that the diploma awarded by the Institute is that of graduate chemical engineer from the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Paris. In November 1906, Henri Moissan became the first French recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He had indeed isolated fluorine twenty years earlier, in 1886, during a well-known experiment, which subsequently enabled syntheses at very high temperatures.

1909

Camille Chabrié is appointed Director of the Chemical Institute.

1910

The construction of the current building, which is intended to host the Institute, starts at Pierre Curie street. Construction is interrupted in 1914, and finally completed in 1920.

1916

After 2 years of closure, the Institute reopens its doors. Thanks to Camille Chabrié, girls are now allowed to take the entrance examination. Mss. Cottereau and Mss. Force join the school and graduate in 1919.

1916

1920

Inauguration of the school.
In February 1920, 80 first-year students take up residence at Pierre and Marie Curie street. The Institute’s buildings were completed only in 1923-1924.

1930

The School becomes the Institute of Chemistry of Paris (ICP). Teaching becomes more diversified, both in the field of chemistry and in the human and social sciences. The school intensifies its relationships with the industry and prioritizes internships and field trips.
The name Institute of Chemistry of Paris (ICP) is officially recognized by the Ministry of National Education in 1945.

1930

1928-1938

Georges Urbain, Professor of General Chemistry at the Sorbonne, manages the school during this period. Under his leadership, research is flourishing. Research laboratories are created: the electrochemistry laboratory, the applied physical chemistry laboratory and the industrial chemistry laboratory.

1928-1938

1948

Following the creation of the ENSI (the “Ecoles Nationales Supérieures d’Ingénieurs”, the National Engineering Schools) by a January 16, 1947 decree, the ICP becomes the National School of Chemistry of Paris by a March 27, 1948 decree. The system of studies, the admission of students and the school’s staff are all governed by the 1947 decree.
The engineering degree is now registered and approved by the Ministry of National Education.
The school uses a special entrance exam to recruit its students. Students prepare for it over a full year, either in the College of Sciences, or in a few secondary education institutions in Paris which, in addition to other preparatory classes for the entrance exams of other schools, have a preparatory class for the ENSCP and the ESPCI. Such schools include the Chaptal College, the Lavoisier College and the Claude Bernard High School.
The number of admissions awarded each year is fixed by order of the Minister of National Education (about 50).

1948

1966

The school holds all classes on its premises with a program specific to ENSCP; students no longer need a degree in science to be awarded their diploma, but only an overall average of 12 out of 20.

1986

Under the January 26, 1984 law on higher education, the status of the School becomes that of a Public Administrative Institution (PAI) attached to the University Pierre and Marie Curie – Paris VI by a March 14, 1986 decree (Article 43). It then enjoyed a pedagogical, administrative and financial autonomy to better adapt to developments in science and industrial techniques.

1999

In 1999, the National School of Chemistry of Paris became a founding member of ParisTech, which was structured in 2007 into a research and higher education center (PRES) with EPCPST status.

2008

In December 2008, the National School of Chemistry of Paris takes on the brand name “Chimie ParisTech”.

2010

Wishing to consolidate its location in Paris and its network of active collaborations, Chimie ParisTech, along with the ESPCI ParisTech, the Ecole Normale Supérieure, the College of France and the Observatoire, founded the PRES Paris Sciences and Letters – Latin Quarter, in the form of a Foundation for Scientific Cooperation.
This PRES becomes the Paris Sciences and Letters Commission (PSL Commission) in 2012.

2011

Very committed to its autonomy, Chimie ParisTech switches to Extended Responsibilities and Competences (ERC) on January 1st, 2011.

2015

In 2015, ENSCP’s status changes to a Scientific, Cultural and Professional Public Establishment (“Etablissement Public à caractère Scientifique, Culturel et Professionnel”, EPSCP) by Decree No. 2015-1286 of October 14, 2015.